Monday, October 26, 2009

Towne Club Pop

25 comments:

  1. Yep. With the money you save on Towne Club Pop, you can buy 5 loaves of Wonder White Bread!

    Wash your hyper-refined flour down with some carbonated sugar water.

    America's obesity problem has been 40 years in the making.

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  2. Forget the pop. Who is she?

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  3. hey long time no post....here goes

    i remember the soda pop shoppe..wow thats with 2 ps and 1e

    seems like it was roughly where little ceasars is on ballenger just north of couranna rd.

    a store with nothing but pop cases and cases....the idea was mix and match....even at my young age of 5 or 6 back in the sixties i wondered how can they survive just selling pop??????

    we had a few regional favs...vernors, m&s, towne club, soda pop shoppe, faygo used to be regional i think.....strange times, but simple times

    thankfully my parents were from the south...pepsi drinkers....i later learned the soothing effect of an ice cold coke(before it was classic) on a hangover....jump in the car and cruise up to mary's dairy didn't even have to get out of the car....and it came in a very tall glass bottle....ahhh the best elixar for a young man's hangover.....now those were the days!!!!

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  4. When I was a kid people used to call me "Hester the Towne Club Taste Tester" as there was a TV or radio ad with a guy named "Chester-The towne Club Taste Tester"?
    I think the name was Chester, wasn't it?! Anybody remember?

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  5. I don't see the savings when you add the bottle deposit. This must have been about 1963 when a dollar at Hamady's would get you three loaves of bread or three half gallons of milk for the same price. Ten cans of Campbell's tomato soup for a buck. Ten cans of pork and beans for a buck. The pop comparison doesn't sound like a savings to me. Got to be a quirk here somewhere...unclebuck

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  6. I think there was a Towne Club Pop store in the strip mall on the corner of Robert T. Longway and Dort Hwy.

    What a family tradition it was to make our trip to exchange our empty bottles for new "Pop"

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  7. she's higher than a kite.

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  8. Flintstoner --

    If you're thinking about the pop shop that was located in that area right around where Musical Memories is located today -- I think that it was a Hood's Soda Pop shoppe. If my memory serves me right -- Towne Club pop stores were in the Detroit area.

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  9. No Flintstoner80,
    Wasn't the Soda Pop Shoppe where the Crusin nightclub is now on Dort Highway? That strip mall on Robert T. and Dort was a Kroger grocery store and Top Value Stamp store. Remember---get the green stamps at Kroger, and shop next door at Top Value with the stamps!!! Don't forget the Fotomat in the same parking lot to the east...

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    1. I hung out bike riding in that Kroger lot back in the 70's.. don't forget all the candy at Camburn Drugs. and the sweeeet back alley behind the strip mall that we thought we were pretty hard core walking down and heading to Rock a Rolla records.

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  10. The truth about obesity is that it's not so much what you eat or drink, but how much you eat or drink. A lot of food and drink just passes through the GI tract. Stress also pays a big role in overeating. And if you define obesity down, it's only natural that the number increases. I agree though that overeating or ingesting too many carbonated beverages can lead to problems, including obesity. But to enjoy a cola or red pop now and then won't hurt you.

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  11. Do any other ex-pats catch crap when they say "pop" instead of "soda" or "soda-pop?"

    I try to acclimate myself wherever I go but I can't stop saying "pop"! POP! POP! Gimme a POP dammit!

    I'm getting better though...Coke seems to work world wide.

    Thankfully, I don't feel the need to take the Pepsi challenge like that boy that tried to mess with that 72 year old guy.

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  12. Sadly, and I'm not sure exactly when it happened, but I've been assimilated into saying "soda"... a sad day indeed. The East Coast sucks.

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  13. Grumkin --

    I hope that you haven't become so "east coast" that you're calling coneys by the name of "hot dogs". If that happens -- you'll have to come back to Flint for (as the Firesign Theater would say) "regrooving".

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  14. Yeah, Grumkin. And are you now so far gone that you stand on line instead of in line?

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  15. I remember a Soda Pop Shoppe place on Fenton Road, south of Bristol. Think it was still around in 1990.

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  16. I've held out on the "on line"... that just irks me too much. I notice it every time someone says it here.

    Also, everyone here goes "food shopping". Instead of just saying "I'm going to the grocery store" or "grocery shopping", they say "I'm going food shopping".

    I'm not sure if that's an East Coast thing or a suburb East Coast thing, but it bugs me.

    The absolute worst, of course, is when your child grows up with a New Yowark accent. Currently, I am his Muddah. He's still young though, so it may be a Ming-Ming influence, I can't be sure.

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  17. Towne Club had a big selection, but nothing - NOTHING - could beat Orange and Grape Crush or a good root beer for me. As for the store, I seem to recall a Towne Club store over in the Miller Rd plaza by K-Mart - or am I too far south?

    And believe me - I was ASSAILED for using the word "pop" when I was in grad school at UM-AA, where all my East Coast friends and colleagues drilled the word "soda" into my head. Here in Vienna, though, no one knows the word "pop" or "soda" anyway so I just spare myself the anguish of having to figure out what to ask for and drink wine and beer instead.

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  18. My best memory of Orange Crush and Grape Crush were getting one at the old tennis club (the one with the clay courts)... they had one of those vending machines with the doors and you pulled the bottles out. I love orange and grape crush.

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  19. For those who were not readers of Flint Expatriates back in December 2008 when the the Pop/Soda subject was last discussed, here is my comment from then resubmitted: BJ said...
    The first week I lived in New Jersey, my coming here after 25 years in Flint and 8 in Oak Park, I asked a waitress if I could have Pop with my meal. She looked at me straight faced and said, he's the little old guy who cleans up in the kitchen, but I'll ask him if he wants to join you when he finishes sweeping the floor. Afer the embarrasing and uproarious ribbing I took from my work dining colleagues, I've been carefully asking for Soda for 31 years now without much fail. It only took one episode of being the joke of the restaurant to change my Michigan habits fast. Not as painful a a slap to the head, but just as effective. I still miss Michigan.

    December 15, 2008 4:53 PM

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  20. I'm going socks shopping tomorrow. I thought you would want to know Grumkin:0).

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  21. Another Flint speech habit not readily accepted by East Coasters is calling the piece of candy on a stick a "sucker"; for what the Easterners only refer to as a lollipop. I have created surprized looks on faces that one would have thought I substituted an "F"" for the "S" in sucker. It seems to be fully acceptable when referring to someone who fell for a joke or scheme but not to the candy.

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  22. Not sure that one has come up in conversation for me yet BJ. I always thought a sucker was flat and the lollipops were spheres... but I just came up with that, as I've never really thought about it before.

    NarlinsNow - they also say, "I'm going to the Food Store"... like it's feed barn or something... :0p

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